Satellite Image Of Hurricane Dora, Storms Bret And Cindy

F. LETUVEE
Par F. LETUVEE 21 Juil 2011 12:25

Satellite Image Of Hurricane Dora, Storms Bret And Cindy

Two tropical storms, named Bret and Cindy, are now in the open waters of the North Atlantic, while Hurricane Dora is continuing to strengthen in the eastern Pacific, off the west coast of Mexico. All three systems were captured on one GOES-13 satellite image, issued by NASA/NOAA on Thursday.

Cindy and Bret are hundreds of miles to the east-northeast of Bermuda and are not expected to pose a threat to land areas.

NASA’s GOES Project issued an infrared image of Dora as well as both Bret and Cindy today from the GOES-13 satellite, which is operated by NOAA. The image was captured at 0845 UTC (4:45 a.m. EDT) and shows Bret about 405 miles east-southeast of Bermuda, while Cindy is about 975 miles east-northeast of Bermuda.

Dora, a Category 4 hurricane is approximately 445 miles south-southeast of Cabo San Lucas in Mexico and heading northwest at 12 mph. The eye of the hurricane is clearly visible (click on image for a larger view). The U.S. National Hurricane Center said it expects Dora’s core to lose strength later on Thursday and weaken rapidly tomorrow. Dora also is expected to remain well offshore.

According to NASA: “At 5 a.m. EDT, Bret was still holding on to tropical storm status with maximum sustained winds near 40 mph, just over the 39 mph threshold. It was moving to the northeast near 8 mph and is expected to continue in this direction while speeding up and weakening over the next couple of days. Bret’s centre was near 33.1 North latitude and 71.7 West longitude. Bret is expected to dissipate by the weekend. Infrared satellite data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument on NASA’s Aqua satellite indicated that the cloud top temperatures in the southern quadrant of the Bret are as cold as -70 Celsius, indicating strong, high thunderstorms and strong convection.”

“Meanwhile Tropical Storm Cindy developed overnight from System 99L that NASA was watching yesterday afternoon. Cindy developed into Tropical Depression 3, and quickly grew into a tropical storm and got her name.

As of 5 a.m. EDT today, July 21, Cindy’s maximum sustained winds were near 60 mph, and she’s expected to strengthen over the next day before colder waters sap her energy. She’s centered near 38.3 North and 49.1 West and moving to the northeast at a speedy 28 mph. Cindy’s forward speed is also expected to increase over the next couple of days. Her minimum central pressure is near 1002 millibars”, NASA added.

For more images from the GOES-13 satellite click here.

http://www.irishweatheronline.com

F. LETUVEE
Par F. LETUVEE 21 Juil 2011 12:25